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Comment Archives: stories: News & Views: Cover

Re: “The Unofficial Underwear Issue

According to the Museum of Menstruation, women’s underwear as we know it today (close fitting briefs), didn’t exist until the 1930s. Of course there was the pair in the Austrian floorboards, but it is safe to assume that, tucked away as they were, they did not influence 20th century fashions. The first mention of “briefs” (so brief! Barely pantaloons at all!) the museum could find was in the Sears Roebuck catalog of 1935, where special mention was made that they were “every day” briefs. This harkens back to the nuanced world of menstruation containment. Before women wore fitted underpants every day, they wore them only monthly, to keep pads in place. Some historians believe the menstrual brief was designed based on diapers, which in turn inspired the prototype of all modern women’s underwear.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by less-is-best on 12/17/2014 at 2:52 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

This article really summed up everything for me. I would describe myself as being professional but down-to-earth, edgy, single, 40s, African American, highly educated and a bit of a wanderer. I'm drawn to urban, cultural, intellectually stimulating cities. I moved to CLT a little over two years ago having never visited the city for a job opportunity (1st mistake). Based on what I heard about the city; "mini-Atlanta", "on-the-come-up", "thriving culture", etc., I thought perfect! Charlotte would be an ok place to live for a while. So, I took a chance and migrated all the way to NC sight-un-seen. (2nd mistake) In other words, I fell for the hype big time. Man was I bamboozled!!! Charlotte fell way short of my expectations. And the mini-Atlanta comments are far from true. I found it to be sorely lacking socially. The Queen City lacks something and I can't really put my fingers on it. I'll describe it as very sleepy, boondock-ish & ultra corn-fed country. In fact, it was the most depressing & lonely experience of my life. Some days when I start second guessing myself and start thinking that PERHAPS I didn't give the city enough of a chance, articles like this serve as validation.

Posted by Pebbles on 12/17/2014 at 12:02 AM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

As a native who just moved to California last year from Charlotte. I fill like I have hit the jackpot. Charlotte is great for families and if you are settled. If you are African-American/Single/Over 30, fuh-get about it. :) Charlotte was stale, boring and just plain vanilla. You just don't have the option that you could have any other cities..... Yes, I miss family and friends and Charlotte will always be my home...but right- now...Los Angeles is home....And am I a lot happier?.....h#ll to the Yes!!!!! Charlotte is a nice place to live...but to live life...NOT!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by OuttaCharlotte on 11/24/2014 at 8:59 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

WolvesAtTheDoor, Charlotte *IS* a young city though. It was founded before Atlanta and Chicago, but was nothing more than a big town for most of its existence; it hit its stride and began booming and urbanizing well after those cities did.

I'm a former Charlottean now living in Atlanta so of course the differences are obvious to me, but the comparison to larger, more established cities is unfair, although understandable to an extent.

It's just going to take time for Charlotte to get there.

Posted by Akhenaton06 on 11/24/2014 at 11:54 AM

Re: “CL goes undercover in a Charlotte 'crisis pregnancy center'

I am a pro- choice, agnostic, liberal who has used their services and this article is a joke. The woman here are very helpful and not once did they pressure me to keep the baby or flat out ask anything about religion, wonder if this "article" is even credible.

Posted by 84nk on 11/21/2014 at 10:30 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

And why do only see the validation of black culture and entertainment when it's mainstreamed? If isn't uptown then it isn't successful.

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Shannise Jackson-Ndiaye on 11/03/2014 at 6:43 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

Interesting article! I think most of the responses make valid points. I left Charlotte over a year ago and I miss the small quaint circles of creative people I was just getting to know. I live in the DMV area now and it is pretentious and overpriced. I think Charlotte has a lot to offer but could stand to be a little more inclusive to newcomers and focus on being authentic.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Shannise Jackson-Ndiaye on 11/03/2014 at 5:41 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

I think this article is very accurate and very well written. I have been in the Charlotte area a little over 2 years and I am still looking for "Charlotte". The social scene is awful esepcially for a single person like myself. The crazy thing is there are people here but you have dog for them or get in the right circles as people only come out for events someone on their circle is having. Its sad that I have to resort to joining sites such as Meet up just to be around other young black proffesionals. I will definitely support Sydneys now and other venues people have mentioned. Hopefully something will change sooner than later !!

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dee on 11/03/2014 at 9:34 AM

Re: “A school shooting rattles small-town North Carolina

A little birdie told me he stabbed the other student 17 times supposedly because the kid bullied him.

Maybe he will now be transferred to a Charlotte school.

Posted by Garth Vadar on 11/01/2014 at 8:42 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

I just moved to Charlotte from Philly about 15 months ago and I must say that charlotte is very boring. They do have events that go on here but they don't know how to market them so that people that are interested in particular events will come out and support. The way that you get a diverse crowd is promote the event and those that want it will attend. Living in other cities you see this. Like if it's a hip hop event it won't be all black it's going to be diverse cause the cultural crosses color lines. As long as your having a good time with good like minded people that's all that matters. When Charlotte gets this then you will see things change. Put a good product out there and learn how to market.

10 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by skydog724 on 11/01/2014 at 7:45 AM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

Charlotte used to have a thriving Black community in 2nd Ward Uptown called Brooklyn. It was virtually a self-contained city within the city. Read more about and on what happened to this once prosperous largely African American community. http://www.history.uncc.edu/publichistory/pages/oralhist/brooklyn/briefhis.htm

4 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by MPH on 11/01/2014 at 2:36 AM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

Great story Jarvis. Spot on. Hopefully people who are not part of the "young professional" community talked about in your article will read your story and realize there is a demographic (with money to spend) that is not being targeted by local businesses. Personally, I'm tired of the attitude of Charlotteans who say during weeks like CIAA that they will just stay home, as if to say they would prefer to avoid large crowds of African-Americans. I might add that it's an insult to go to an event and experience price gouging for parking or have automatic gratuities added to a bill only when CIAA is in town. On a positive note, thank you for highlighting Black owned businesses and venues that do not get much attention. We need to patronize them and encourage promoters to host events at these places. Keep up the good work!

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Kole Davis on 10/31/2014 at 7:42 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

Sad to say but I think as "new" black folk continue to move in, this will eventually change. I was riding in a cab years ago and the driver made the same arguments about this being a good ol' boy town and not making any room at the table for others......I wasn't really trying to hear that then being that I was still pretty young and making what I considered at the time, good money at one of those good ol' boy institutions uptown. However, as I've gotten older and moved out of the city (8/13) I can see what he and others were saying. It's old and new money all around the Queen City but we's (natives) still scared to celebrate, build up and endorse our own culture, schools and businesses. The upwardly mobiles are too busy culturally assimilating. Just my two cents.

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Angel on 10/31/2014 at 7:35 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

@ Tracy Watkins

Kais Kookies is horrible. It's a blatant and poor attempt to replicate the Cami's Cupcakes chain in Atlanta. Horrible customer service, sub par cookies and just an overall blah experience. Please recommend something else to us newcomers because I am far from impressed by Kais Kookies.

6 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by WolvesAtTheDoor on 10/31/2014 at 6:49 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

This place has no Black culture, it is quite depressing actually. I was born in Chicago, went to college in DC and then moved to ATL after that. Lived in ATL for 10 years and I came here about 2 years ago. Being in ATL the last decade has really spoiled me and I was totally let down when I actually moved here. Because I to got caught up in the CIAA hype after visiting and didn't realize that this city is dead the other 51 weekends of the year.

And can we please stop hearing the Charlotte is a young city argument? It's older than both ATL and Chicago. That entire premise is a straw man and merely an excuse for the lack of flavor ad culture among the local African Americans.

In other words this place is beyond boring and if they even want to be mentioned in the same breath as AA culture hotbeds like NYC, ATL, DC, Chicago and LA then they have a very, very, very long way to go.

11 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by WolvesAtTheDoor on 10/31/2014 at 6:46 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

Did I miss something . No mention of Tanners

1 like, 2 dislikes
Posted by Carlos Burton on 10/30/2014 at 10:00 PM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

Jarvis your article is dead on. Being born and raised in the DMV, I find it disheartening that there is a great deal of social segregation. I believe it's intentional for the mere fact that the "black dollar" isn't valued except when there aren't many "white dollars" rolling in the doors of venues (I.e., CIAA). As a result, little to nothing is done to attract African Americans professional or otherwise to diversify more. I myself miss the melting pot that I'm accustom to experiencing. It's the culture here in Charlotte and "old money" runs the city, therefore so does "old segregated tradition. " Not sure how to change this, except with time. In regards to minority ownership, we fail due to lack of education and underfunded efforts. In addition, the city doesn't provide as much minority business support or programs as other major cities. I hope I'm around to see some changes happen soon.

13 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Talk of the Town on 10/30/2014 at 11:53 AM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

Loved the article but you failed to mention several African Americans who are in Charlotte and contributing bad well as representing. Lonnie Davis who started the Jazz Series at Blumenthal, Antonio Diaz and Keith Whatley who have held the international 15 Short Film Festival for nine years, and Groove 8 a jazz funk band made up of several Charlotte musicians who have traveled the world but never forgetting the local music scene which gets no props from CL or the press.

5 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Antonio Diaz on 10/30/2014 at 10:14 AM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

It's sad that a lot of African Americans don't know about Kai's Kookies and More, a black owned late night Southern style bake and coffee house. It is working on its 4th year here in Charlotte. It is located at 3905 South Blvd. Www.kaiskookies.com Check it out.

10 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Tracy Watkins on 10/30/2014 at 6:47 AM

Re: “A look at why the African-American cultural scene struggles to thrive in Charlotte

I like to think I am in tune with the Entertainment Industry. A large number of my music friends are black and many of the groups that rehearse at our family's business are black or mixed with a greater weight toward the black performers. I think the Arts are largely shunned, ignored, pushed aside and disrespected. The Art's being all of the Arts (colorless). That's just this white girls opinion, but I do want to know what my friends in the black entertainment community think. We hosted a music conference that is designed for all genres of music when the Music Factory pushed them out because they didn't want "urban acts". The CIAA had recently left several venues with damage, one even closed it's doors permanently. These were not the actions of locals or even the legitimate basketball fans but out of towners and trouble makers. And like anything else the bad actions and decisions of a few are recognized above all the good and hurt everyone.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by MusicMomma on 10/29/2014 at 1:46 PM

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