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Twinemen - Comprised of Dana Colley and Billy Conway from the late, great Morphine along with singer and songwriter Laurie Sargent, Twinemen still purvey the lo-rock sound that their former band made famous. But Sargent's voice and the addition of multiple instruments and non-linear arrangements help keep the group from becoming mere methadone. See our story in this issue. With Bellglide. Amos' Southend (Davis)


Bob Margolin - A touring warhorse, Margolin learned from the best during his eight-year apprenticeship with Muddy Waters' band in the 70s. His latest, The Bob Margolin All-Star Blues Jam, was nominated for a 2004 W.C. Handy Award for "Traditional Blues Album of the Year," and featured heavy hitters like Pinetop Perkins, Hubert Sumlin, Carey Bell and Charlotte's own Mookie Brill. It's blues in the Chicago vein, just like the Windy City's famous deep dish pizza: thick, rich and very filling. Double Door Inn (Schacht)

Jake Brennan & the Confidence Men - Brennan and his band tread the roads laid down by Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty. Brennan played in a Boston hardcore band before quitting and moving on to a totally different musical outlook. Jake Brennan & the Confidence Men play stark rock interlaced with somber country and piano-laden anthems. It's Brennan's ability to mingle words and music that makes this band intriguing from the first listen. Opening for John Doe. See story on Doe elsewhere in the paper. Visulite Theatre (Shukla)


The Album Leaf - Formerly a member of the bands Tristeza and the bassist for Black Heart Procession, Jimmy LaValle's The Album Leaf (named after Chopin) is the quieter, more thoughtful, more...Icelandic side of the man. Since touring with Icelanders Sigur Ros, LaValle's Sub Pop-sponsored side project has become a full time affair, featuring rocking (gently, as you might a baby) psyche/ice pop heavy on woozy atmospherics and codeine codas. Turn the page. Neighborhood Theatre (Davis)

Andrew McKnight - Here's an everyman story of an environmental engineer who turned his back on the constricting corporate world and picked up his acoustic guitar fulltime for the pursuit of music and a love of the land which it inhabits. McKnight is a folkie with a sweet tenor and a crisp picking style that's comfortable in the realms of blues, folk, uptempo jazz and country. His newest recording, Beyond Borders, is an amalgamation of all those genres along with old-time fiddle tunes and traditional Appalachian music. Center for Positive Living (Shukla)

Baleen - Their songs offer the kind of challenge music lovers should relish, engaging the head as well as the heart. You can hear for yourself by attending this gig, as the band will be handing out advance copies of their as-yet-unnamed five-song EP to the first 100 people in attendance. Their latest full-length, Sedate Everyone So You Can Get Away With Anything, is an engaging mash-up of styles including progressive rock, electronica, hip-hop and jazz (to name a few). They also recently added 30 covers to their repertoire, so don't be surprised to hear some familiar songs given the Baleen treatment. With Calabi Yau. Visulite Theatre (Schacht)

Blind Dates - Recently reunited for Penny Craver's last night at Tremont Music Hall, such a fun time was had by all that these Blind Dates decided to go out on a second one. Featuring Holly Harper on guitar, Deanna Campbell (Deanna Lynn, Second Skin, Violet Strange) on guitar and vocals, Gina Stewart (Volatile Baby, Doubting Thomas) on bass and vocals and Craver herself on drums, the reconstituted Dates still pack the same smart pop-rock punch they always did (If you've ever seen Craver verbally beat down an unruly clubgoer, wait till you see her attack the drum kit). With The Spongetones. Amos' Southend (Davis)

Westrin-Mowry Band / Anais Mitchell - A Lansing, Michigan-based duet, their website says they've been "classified as many things, from the illegitimate children of Hall and Oates to the two guys that play the local college bar every Wednesday night." Their debut, One Week Epiphany suggests that they have a broader appeal, invoking both Jeff Buckley and Jon Mayer in their literate, harmony-rich songs. With Starting Tuesday. (Schacht) / Stark, literate coffeehouse folk that manages to quote Eliot, Orwell, Prince and (Gram) Parsons without seeming like a Borders advertising arm, Anais Mitchell's Hymns For The Exiled is not easy listening (her voice is an acquired taste), but it is a relatively rewarding one, provided you're looking for...well, stark, literate coffeehouse folk. While a cool death metal band name, Black Lung Disease ain't the easiest thing to sing about, but damn if she doesn't pull it off. The Evening Muse (Davis)


Dixie Dregs / Steve Morse Band - Morse is a Southern rock guitar god going back 30 years with the seminal Dixie Dregs. The Dregs' jazz-intoned instrumental rock invoked such hits as "Punk Sandwich," "Free Fall," and "Refried Funky Chicken." Morse sits among the guitarists able to make the six-string monster an extension of their musical persona. He also put in a long stint as the guitarist for latter day Deep Purple. Tonight, Morse will pull double duty with the Dregs headlining and SMB warming things up. Neighborhood Theatre (Shukla)


Built Like Alaska - Simon says bands on the Future Farmer imprint always deserve a close listen, and this quintet from the musically fertile wastelands of the Central Valley in California are no exception. Sporting a sound located somewhere between label-mates Grandaddy (circa Under the Western Freeway-era) and the fucking brilliant radio-proof outfit Fuck, Built Like Alaska would appear to have it going on. Their debut, Autumnland, certainly suggests as much. It must be something in the water out there, which would be kind of ironic because there isn't much except for what they steal from Northern California. The Room (Schacht)

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