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Cary School: Slavery Not So Bad 

Here's something you may have missed during the holiday rush that you may be interested in, considering the upcoming King Holiday. The Raleigh News & Observer reported in early December that Cary Christian School (in Cary, NC) is using a booklet titled "Southern Slavery, As It Was" as part of its ninth grade curriculum. The booklet, which tries to offer a biblical justification for slave ownership, also claims that slavery was "a relationship based upon mutual affection and confidence," and that slave life was "a life of plenty, of simple pleasures, of food, clothes, and good medical care."

As William Jelani Cobb wrote on Africana.com, "Listen close and you can almost hear the banjoes strumming in the background."

The booklet's authors, Douglas Wilson and Steve Wilkins, are well-known defenders of the Confederacy, which they have portrayed as the last true Christian civilization. Wilkins is a director of the Alabama-based League of the South, which is classified as a "hate group" by the Southern Poverty Law Center, a longtime civil rights group in Alabama.

Cary Christian School Principal Larry Stephenson admitted that "Slavery is wrong, that's not debatable," but insists that the school is only exposing students to different ideas. "You can have two different sides, a Northern perspective and a Southern perspective," he said.

As former US Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan once said, however, "You're entitled to your own opinion, but you're not entitled to your own facts." Decades of research and scholarship on the nature of Southern slavery has conclusively proved that it was an oppressive, inhumane institution which was resisted by hundreds of slave revolts and attempted revolts, "massa" poisonings, and slave-instigated fires. And that doesn't even begin to deal with that pesky question of the morality of owning other human beings. And you probably thought you were living in the 21st Century.

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