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Shar Marlin [left] as Liz Rico in 'King Liz.'

Shar Marlin [left] as Liz Rico in 'King Liz.'

King Liz is a Black Female Jerry Maguire at the Perfect Moment 

Best of Charlotte winner returns to the stage

Every four years, we flip our TV's to the Olympics and bask in the illusion that women are vital, equal members of the sports world, ascending to the winners' podiums and brightening our winters with their exploits in skiing, luge and figure skating. Then the bubble bursts, the clock strikes midnight and we exit Fantasyland into the drabness of real life where sports is a man's world — until the summer games briefly rekindle the torch two years later.

Between Olympiads, women athletes are regarded as unmarketable, except for the rare tennis player, soccer star, figure skater or elite basketballer of the marginalized WNBA. We couldn't support a WNBA team here, though, could we? There are women broadcasting and reporting local sports all around the country, along with the occasional sideline TV reporter on national feeds, but no woman has ever sat behind the desk with the jocks and coaches for a halftime or postgame NFL broadcast — and networks broadcasting NBA games are also exclusive man caves when a game is in progress.

So triple bravas to Three Bone Theatre for opening Fernanda Coppel's King Liz at precisely the right moment, during the Winter Games when a battery of TV networks is reminding us what women really can do in sports.

Coppel takes us off the NBA court, away from the broadcast booths and studios, behind the scenes and into the sphere of high-powered sports agents vying to represent top-notch b-ball prospects and squeeze team owners for top-dollar contracts. It's an arena that requires smarts, guile, charisma, quick thinking and bargaining grit if you want to reach the top.

click to enlarge Fernanda Coppel.
  • Fernanda Coppel.

This is where Liz Rico is making her mark. Coppel, a lesbian Latina, has said that Liz can be portrayed by either a black or Latina actor. After reading the script several times, director Corlis Hayes saw definite similarities between Liz and the strong women at the heart of August Wilson's cycle of ten dramas chronicling African American life in the 20th century.

"Both playwrights' women are very complex and independent," says Hayes. "Liz Rico has a similar feminine power, like Bernice in The Piano Lesson, Rose in Fences, and Molly in Joe Turner's Come and Gone. These women know what they want and get it. All of them are willing to pay a price."

Only one of them knows hoops.

"Being a NBA fan for years really paid off for [Coppel] because the language and dialogue through the script are realistic and well researched," Hayes reveals. "When she was a little girl, she was obsessed with the Bulls."

Although she says that the jury is still out on whether King Liz is a lesbian, Hayes tells us there is no doubt that she's a feminist and a former athlete — one who had a mean crossover dribble during her playing days at Yale. Liz competes in the Jerry Maguire stratosphere of kingpin agents like Scott Boras and Tom Condon. Her superstar client list puts her in that rarefied air.

"Just as these kings know how to make deals lying, cheating and stealing for their clients so does Liz Rico... Maybe more??" Hayes asks, rhetorically. "She can hold her own against any man in the business and has the tenacity to go toe to toe with her toughest male counterpart to get the NBA deal signed."

In this drama, Liz has her sights set on Freddie Luna, a high school point guard touted as the next LeBron, with all the stats that make such a claim credible. He's got the skillset that would make perennial losers like the New York Knicks salivate at the chance of signing him to a multi-year zillion-dollar contract. But Freddie has a downside. Keeping him marketable will be as challenging for Liz as landing him.

Liz deals with Freddie Luna [center] and his coach.
  • Liz deals with Freddie Luna [center] and his coach.

"He is a young hothead from the Bronx projects with a criminal record," Hayes says. "Freddie lacks the maturity to handle his quick fame and wealth. Still, in Freddie she sees herself ... a young ambitious novice looking for a break in a world that has rarely forgiven those with a tragic past coming out of the projects of urban communities."

So there's a bit of a soft spot marinating in there with Liz's toughness, just not enough to give Hayes any doubts about who she saw in the role. We were as impressed by Shar Marlin as Hayes was when the diva took her latest star turn in an August Wilson play last spring. That performance — directed by Hayes — drew Best Actress accolades in CL's Best of Charlotte awards for 2017.

click to enlarge Corlis Hayes.
  • Corlis Hayes.

"After directing Shar in Wilson's Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," Hayes confides, "I could not think of anyone else that could bring the passion, power and sensuality that I needed for Liz. Shar is a powerhouse, and she gets the character. She is not afraid of a challenge and willing to put in the work. And who else can deliver those juicy and nasty zingers throughout the play than Shar?"

Marlin has played two blues empresses in recent years, Bessie Smith for OnQ Productions in For the Love of Harlem and Ma Rainey at CPCC Theatre. Playing those roles enabled Marlin to see beyond their bold and brassy fronts — down to the vulnerabilities that afflicted and weakened all African Americans nearly a century ago.

"It's a wide leap for me," Marlin maintains. "Being a boss in a more modern day piece makes me feel empowered and stronger than my characters in past performances."

But that bluesy toughness definitely comes in handy. And so does her sports-savvy family.

"The essence of Ma Rainey and Bessie Smith has been carried over into this piece, especially when it comes to being respected for their gift and craft," Marlin admits. "Their tough exterior and courage, to me, has been the true foundation for Liz Rico. Learning the ins and outs of basketball is definitely out of my comfort zone. I'm a girlie girl. Having a son and husband who know the sport truly has helped me connect to the industry as a whole."

Freddie turns out to be quite a handful for even the ever-resourceful Liz. She has found how good it is to be the king after she has lied, cheated, gabbed and called upon her sex appeal to reach that pinnacle. But in discovering a connection with Freddie, Liz reaches a turning point, realizing that she may not be as fulfilled as she thought.

"Her growth is very evident in this piece because you see in the beginning that she is solely about money, power and position," says Marlin, careful about revealing too much. "Her goal in life is to be on top, but that top position will come with an ultimate price. In the end, a huge wake up call will turn her ideas of success into an unexpected revelation."

Whatever that revelation is, you can expect Marlin to deliver it powerfully.

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