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Stupidity Sweepstakes winner! 

Union County jihad against 'vitamin teacher'

Welcome, dear readers, to another session of Ask Boomer With Attitude, live from Charlotte where the new city motto is "Young & Black? You Got A Target On Your Back." We have real reader questions this week, so let's get right to it. Note that one of the following questions is made up; see if you can tell which one it is.

Dear BWA: I'm dying to know: what's the stupidest thing you've heard of lately? -- Just Curious

Dear Just Curious: Thanks for asking! This week, the winner of the stupidity sweepstakes is the government of Union County, specifically the school system and the Sheriff's Office. They arrested Stephen Doorly, a third-grade teacher at Marvin Elementary in Union County, and suspended him from his job, after he was found to have given three of his students actual vitamin pills! before end-of-grade testing. Doorly was suspended for "dispensing medications to students," even though vitamins are a food supplement, not medication. He was also arrested on three counts of (get this) "contributing to the delinquency of a juvenile." For vitamins! Wow, I guess if he'd given one of the kids an Excedrin, he'd have been shot on the spot, like they do in Charlotte. The best part of this idiocy is that it was another teacher who "turned him in." What kind of total ... oh, don't get me started.

Dear BWA: What's all the fuss about City Council's plan to give itself a raise? Won't that let them take more time to do their jobs well? -- Sarah M. Klempf

Dear Sarah: The most common objection to a fat, 27 percent raise for City Council and mayor is that other city workers won't get anywhere near that large a bump in their paychecks. In fact, Charlotte will still pay its workers less on average than other cities, even after a raise. An unspoken objection (at least publicly -- this is Charlotte, after all) is that the current crop of Council members isn't worth what it's getting now, much less deserving of a raise; with a couple of exceptions, I'd have to agree. Unless the city adopts a system with a full-time council and mayor (which is reasonable for a city of Charlotte's size), a 27 percent raise is excessive, and you have to be politically tone-deaf to enact it. The city should go ahead and make council and mayor positions full-time, including an appropriate raise, and bump up city workers' salaries so we're at least at the national average, and be done with it.

Dear BWA: I don't even need to ask -- I bet you're in favor of letting illegal immigrants' kids attend state colleges. -- Native Son

Dear Native Son: I'm always glad to take a question from one of our American Indian brothers. What? You're not? Oh, so you're not all that native, huh?

Yes, I support letting the children of illegal immigrants attend state colleges. Unlike our brave state leaders, though, I also think the kids should only be charged in-state tuition. They live here, their parents' actions aren't their responsibility, and we should support any N.C. resident who wants to get a higher education. End of story. Anything less is unjust, counterproductive to North Carolina's welfare, and based on simple prejudice.

Dear BWA: With all the recent criticism in the media about John McCain's lobbyist problems, how can you say the press is biased in favor of the Republican candidate? -- McCain Fan

Dear Fan: Gee, maybe it's the last 10 or more years of media stories about what a "straight-shooter" and "independent" politician McCain is when, in fact, he's as surrounded by lobbyists as anyone in D.C. As for the national press corps, if liberal bloggers hadn't hammered the media about McCain's lobbyist ties, the story would never have made it off the Internet. If you want more evidence of the media's inclination to go light on McCain, you can't do better than the recent release of the 71-year-old senator's health records from the past eight years. Here's part of what the medical records, all 1,200 pages of them, revealed: McCain is being treated for kidney stones; he's had every type of skin cancer known to medicine, resulting in multiple surgeries as well the removal of several pre-cancerous lesions; he takes medication for high blood pressure, kidney problems, high cholesterol, blood clots, and allergies; he had a lens implanted in one of his eyes; he had several polyps removed from his colon, as well as 34 lymph nodes from his neck; and he suffers from degenerative arthritis from his war wounds, as well as vertigo. And that's just from the past eight years. So how did the media report on McCain's health records? Newspapers reported the senator's health as everything from "near-excellent" to "fit and ready." And television? As pointed out in a The Daily Show video montage, they said McCain is "fit as a fiddle," "in tip-top shape," and "in really good health," while one TV pundit even chuckled and asked, "Is 71 the new 30?" Take a look at that list of medical problems again. That's really good health?

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